A Poor Man's Continuous Deployment System Using Docker

I’ve implemented a “continuous deployment” (CD) system centered on Docker. I have not studied any standard approaches to CD. In this “system”, automated updates of things are not triggered by events such as code commit, but rather by scheduled cron jobs. There is no test suits to be run automatically—this is not because I do not consider testing to be essential, but rather is aligned with the reality of my (team’s) code. On the other hand, the type of deployed code that is of concern here is mostly batch-mode pipelines, for which a crash in production is not the end of the world. There is no doubt that my solution is crude, but it is practical. For its purpose, it does a pretty good job.

The setting

Suppose I and a small team develop back-end data pipelines. All of our code is hosted on Github under organization my-org. We have three repos:

  • infra: this is a general framework/utility library that our other work uses.
  • app1: this is a particular work component, which makes use of infra.
  • my-docker: this contains Docker image definitions and related tools for infra, app1 (and other repos in a position similar to that of app1).

All the code is in Python. There is a top-level directory in repo app1, named scripts, that contains pipeline scripts that are deployed in production.

Our Docker images are stored in AWS Elastic Container Service (ECS).

There are several goals for this automation system:

  1. Docker images are automatically re-built when appropriate. There are three occasions that demand image rebuild:
    1. Image definition in my-docker has changed.
    2. Some code in infra or app1 has changed, and the code is to be “sealed” in an image.
    3. An upstream image has been re-built, requiring the rebuild of a downstream image.
  2. On a development machine (or deployment machine), simple commands are defined for launching Docker images. They automatically launch the latest version that exists in ECS. If the latest version is already present on the local machine, the launch is fast. Otherwise, downloading will happen, which takes some time.
  3. Once new code is merged into the develop branch of the repo app1, deployed pipelines in app1/scripts/, triggered by cron, automatically run in a properly rebuilt image that contain the new code.

The my-docker repo

This repo started like this:

my-docker/
  |-- py3dev/
  |     |-- Dockerfile
  |     |-- build.sh
  |-- infra-prod/
  |     |-- Dockerfile
  |     |-- build.sh
  |-- infra-dev/
  |     |-- Dockerfile
  |     |-- build.sh
  |-- app1-prod/
  |     |-- Dockerfile
  |     |-- build.sh
  |-- app1-dev/
  |     |-- Dockerfile
  |     |-- build.sh
  |-- build.sh
  |-- run-docker
  |-- common.sh
  |-- pipeline
  |-- pyscript
  |-- auto-build
  |-- auto-build.sh

Some explanation of the relations between our images is in order.

py3dev is the base of them all. It contains Python 3.6, some common Python packages, Jupyter notebook, utilities, a nice editor (neovim, that is), and so on. In addition, it has a user account docker-user. All code execution in our containers is via this user.

infra-dev is used for developing the code in repo infra. Importantly, it does not contain infra code, but rather volume-map the infra code directory on the local machine into the container, so that code changes can happen both from insider and outside of the container, and test run always uses the latest in-development code. If infra depends on some third-party libraries, they are installed in infra-dev. This image is based on py3dev.

infra-prod is the ‘production’ or ‘deployed’ image of infra. It is based on infra-dev (which contains third-party dependencies of infra) and, importantly, contains, say, the develop branch of the infra code. The infra code sealed in the infra-prod image is read-only, appropriate for production use.

app1-dev is used for developing the code in repo app1. It contains third-party dependencies of app1, is based on infra-prod, and volume-maps the source code of app1 from the local machine into the container.

app1-prod is based on app1-dev. In addition to the dependences installed in app1-dev, it contains a read-only copy of the app1 code.

Building the images

Let’s not worry about auto-build for now. Let’s use build.sh to build all the images.

build.sh is simple. Below is the entire script:

set -Eeuo pipefail

# The sole optional argument is 'push'.

thisfile="${BASH_SOURCE[0]}"
thisdir="$( cd $( dirname ${thisfile} ) && pwd )"

(cd "${thisdir}"/py3dev && bash build.sh $@)

repos=( infra app1 )
for repo in "${repos[@]}"; do
    (cd "${thisdir}"/${repo}-dev && bash build.sh $@)
    (cd "${thisdir}"/${repo}-prod && bash build.sh $@)
done

The build.sh scripts in the image-specific directories are all similar. They all “source” in the common utility file common.sh, and take one optional argument indicating whether to push the images to AWS ECS.

The entire py3dev/build.sh is as follows:

set -Eeuo pipefail

# The sole optional argument is 'push'.

thisfile="${BASH_SOURCE[0]}"
thisdir="$( cd "$( dirname "${thisfile}" )" && pwd )"
parentdir="$( dirname "${thisdir}" )"
source "${parentdir}/common.sh"

PARENT_IMAGE=python:3.6-slim-stretch

cp -f "${parentdir}/pipeline" "${thisdir}/"
cp -f "${parentdir}/pyscript" "${thisdir}/"
build_simple "${thisdir}" "${PARENT_IMAGE}" py3dev $@
rm -f "${thisdir}/pipeline" "${thisdir}/pyscript"

The script calls the function build_simple the is defined in common.sh and takes one optional argument push. As for the scripts pipeline and pyscript, we’ll get to them alter.

Here is the script infra-dev/build.sh:

set -Eeuo pipefail

# The sole optional argument is 'push'.

thisfile="${BASH_SOURCE[0]}"
thisdir="$( cd "$( dirname "${thisfile}" )" && pwd )"
parentdir="$( dirname "${thisdir}" )"
source "${parentdir}/common.sh"

parent_name=py3dev
parent_version=$(pull_aws_latest ${parent_name})
parent_image=${parent_name}:${parent_version}

build_dev "${thisdir}" "${parent_image}" $@

The commands pull_aws_latest and build_dev are defined in common.sh. The former pulls the latest version of the specified image from AWS ECS (if not already present on the local machine) and returns its tag. The tag is used to specify the parent image for the image being built.

Here is the script ‘infra-prod/buil.sh’:

set -Eeuo pipefail

# Sole optional argument is 'push'.

thisfile="${BASH_SOURCE[0]}"
thisdir="$( cd "$( dirname "${thisfile}" )" && pwd )"
parentdir="$( dirname "${thisdir}" )"
source "${parentdir}/common.sh"

parent_name=infra-dev
parent_version=$(pull_aws_latest ${parent_name})
parent_image=${parent_name}:${parent_version}

build_prod "${thisdir}" "${parent_image}" $@

Note that it specifies infra-dev as the parent image. build_branch is another function defined in common.sh (we’ll get to it).

The script app1-dev/build.sh is identical to infra-dev/build.sh except that parent_name in the script is defined to be infra-prod.

The script app1-prod/build.sh is identical to infra-prod/build.sh except that parent_name in the script is defined to be app1-dev.

Utility functions in common.sh

Now it’s time to demystify the functions defined in common.sh.

We start with the few functions related to finding the latest version of an image on AWS ECS, and on the location machine.

Note that our images on ECS are located at my-org/py3dev, my-org/infra-dev, my-org/infra-prod, my-org/app1-dev, and my-org/app1-prod at the address pointed to by $ECR_URL.

function log_in_aws {
    $(aws ecr get-login --no-include-email --region ${AWS_DEFAULT_REGION}) > /dev/null 2>&1
}


# Find latest tag of specified repo AWS.
# This assumes all tag names are already sort-able, so
# this does not get 'latest' by timestamp, rather just by tag.
function find_aws_latest_tag {
    log_in_aws
    name="my-org/$1"
    z=$(aws ecr list-images \
        --repository-name ${name} \
        --query 'sort_by(imageIds,& imageTag)[-1].imageTag')

    # Remove quotes.
    z=${z#*\"}
    z=${z%\"*}
    echo "$z"
}


# Find latest tag of specified repo on the local machine.
# This assumes all tag names are already sort-able, so
# this does not get 'latest' by timestamp, rather just by tag.
function find_latest_tag {
    docker images "$1" --format "{{.Tag}}" | sort | tail -n 1
}

After some experiments, we settled on tagging images by the UTC timestamp of its build time in this format: 20180923T082316Z. This records the full year, month, day, hour, minute, second, in UTC. With this naming convention, we are able to which image is the newest solely by its tag, ignoring its created/built/pushed-at timestamps.

(At first, we retrieved the tags from AWS ECS with the latest pushedAt timestamp, and found the largest tag among them. We tripped on a tricky corner case. At one point, we made a small change and pushed a new image. Then reverted that change, re-built, re-tagged, and re-pushed. This resulted in the latest tag associated with the second-to-latest pushedAt time. Then, by restricting our search to the latest pushedAt tags, we could not find the truely latest tag; the our code had the wrong idea about whether the AWS iamge is up-to-date. Since then, we’ve switched to this universal-tag-search approach.)

Part of the motivation for this format is that Github returns a repo’s commit time in this format. Using the same format eases comparison (see below).

Below we’ll see that the code constructs the tag in this format when building an image.

Next we look at the functions that deal with pulling/pushing images from/to AWS ECS.

# Pull from AWS and tag it.
function pull_aws {
    log_in_aws
    name="$1"
    version="$2"
    set -x
    docker pull "${ECR_URL}/my-org/${name}:${version}" >&2
    docker tag "${ECR_URL}/my-org/${name}:${version}" "${name}:${version}"
    set +x
}


# Find the latest version on AWS.
# Check if it's present locally.
# If not, pull it.
# Return the tag.
function pull_aws_latest {
    name="$1"
    version="$(find_aws_latest_tag ${name})"
    if [[ $(docker images "${name}:${version}" -q) == "" ]]; then
        echo Latest version of "my-org/${name}" on AWS is "${version}" >&2
        echo Could not find "${name}:${version}" locally\; pulling from AWS... >&2
        pull_aws "${name}" "${version}"
    fi
    echo "${version}"
}

function push_to_aws {
    name="$1"
    version="$2"
    log_in_aws

    tag=${ECR_URL}/my-org/${name}:${version}

    set -x
    docker tag ${name}:${version} ${tag}
    docker push ${tag} >&2
    set +x
}

Note that when we push a local image to AWS or pull an AWS image to local machine, we make sure the local and AWS images have the same tag.

In the build.sh scripts, we call build_dev and build_prod to build development and production images, respectively. The difference between these functions is that the latter takes care of downloading the develop branch of code from Github, unpacking it in the current directory (the Docker build context). Subsequenctly, the Dockerfile is responsible for copying that code into the image, building and installing as appropriate.

The image py3dev does not have a development vs production distinction. It is built by the function build_simple.

Below is the code.

function build_simple {
    build_dir="$1"
    PARENT_IMAGE="$2"
    NAME="$3"
    if [[ $# > 3 ]]; then
        push="$4"
    else
        push=""
    fi

    VERSION="$(date -u +%Y%m%dT%H%M%SZ)"
    # UTC. This command with these arguments work the same on Mac and Linux.
    # Version format is like this:
    #    20180923T081243Z
    # which indicates full datetime accurate to seconds in UTC.
    # This format is chosen to facilitate comparison with Github commit time;
    # see 'get_lastest_branch_commit_date' in 'auto-build.sh'.

    FULLNAME="${NAME}:${VERSION}"

    set -x
    # docker build --build-arg PARENT_IMAGE="${PARENT_IMAGE}" -t "${FULLNAME}" --no-cache "${build_dir}"
    # TODO: remove '--no-cache' once things work fine.
    docker build --build-arg PARENT_IMAGE="${PARENT_IMAGE}" -t "${FULLNAME}" "${build_dir}" >&2
    set +x
    echo

    if [[ "${push}" == "push" ]]; then
        push_to_aws $NAME $VERSION
    fi
}


function build_dev {
    build_dir="$1"
    parent_image="$2"
    image_name="$(basename ${build_dir})"
    if [[ "${image_name}" != *-dev ]]; then
        echo "'build_dev' called from directory '"${image_name}"'"
        return 1
    fi
    shift
    shift
    # optional 3rd argument is 'push'.
    build_simple ${build_dir} ${parent_image} ${image_name} $@
}


function build_prod {
    build_dir="$1"
    parent_image="$2"
    image_name="$(basename ${build_dir})"
    if [[ "${image_name}" != *-prod ]]; then
        echo "'build_prod' called from directory '"${image_name}"'"
        return 1
    fi
    shift
    shift
    # otional 3rd argument is 'push'

    repo="${image_name%-prod}"
    branch=develop

    URL=https://github.com/my-org/${repo}/archive/${branch}.zip
    GIT_TOKEN="Authorization: token ${GITHUB_ACCESS_TOKEN}"
    rm -rf "${build_dir}/src.zip" "${build_dir}/${repo}-develop" "${build_dir}/src"
    curl -skL --retry 3 -H "${GIT_TOKEN}" ${URL} -o "${build_dir}/src.zip"
    (cd "${build_dir}" && unzip src.zip && mv -f ${repo}-${branch} src)
    rm -f "${build_dir}/src.zip"

    build_simple "${build_dir}" "${parent_image}" "${image_name}" $@

    rm -rf "${build_dir}/src"
}

Run Docker containers

Having built the images, let’s develop a script to launch Docker containers based on the images, while taking care of any setup about the container that can be automated. Some main concerns include:

  • Set up environment variables that should be available to programs running inside the container.
  • Set up volumn mapping between the host machine and the container. For example, a “development” container needs to have source code mapped into the container; for “production” containers, it’s important to provide mapping for data, config, and logging directories.
  • Check the version of the image on the local machine as well as in AWS ECS, and pull the latest from AWS as needed.
  • Provide support for running pipelines in a production container, such as take care of logging file rotation.
  • Cater to the need of particular commonly-used programs.

The script is named run-docker. The general pattern of its usage is like this:

run-docker [docker-options] image-name command [args]

The content of run-docker is as follows:

#!/usr/bin/env bash

thisfile="${BASH_SOURCE[0]}"
thisdir="$( cd "$( dirname "${thisfile}" )" && pwd )"
source "${thisdir}/common.sh"

# set -Eeuo pipefail
set -o errexit
set -o nounset
set -o pipefail

# For all the directory and file names touched by this script,
# space in the name is not supported.
# Do not use space in directory and file names in ${HOME}/work and under it.

USAGE=$(cat <<'EOF'
Usage:
   run-docker [--local] image-name [command [...] ]
   run-docker [--local] image-name pipeline py-script-name [...]
   run-docker [--local] image-name pyscript py-script-name [...]

where 

`image-name` is like 'py3dev', 'infra-dev', 'infra-prod', 'app1-dev', etc.

`command` is the command to be run within the container, followed by arguments to the command.
(Default: /bin/bash)

`py-script-name`: name of the Python script, including the extension '.py'.
This script must reside directly under the 'script' folder in the project's repository.

`...`: additional arguments for `command` or `py-script-name`.

If `--local` is present, use local image and do not try to pull the latest from AWS.
All Docker options appear before `image-name`; after `image-name` are command and it arguments.
EOF
)

imagename=""
uselocal="no"
command=/bin/bash
args=""
opts=""

# Parse arguments. After mandatory arguments are obtained,
# remaining arguments are stored, to be passed on.
while [[ $# > 0 ]]; do
    if [[ "${imagename}" == "" ]]; then
        if [[ "$1" == '--local' ]]; then
            uselocal="yes"
        else
            imagename="$1"
        fi
        shift
    else
        # After `image-name`.
        command="$1"
        shift
        args="$@"
        break
    fi
done

if [[ "${imagename}" == "" ]]; then
    echo "${USAGE}"
    exit 1
fi


# Check whether the latest version of the Docker image on AWS is available locally.
# If not, pull it from AWS and tag appropriately.
if [[ "${uselocal}" == "no" ]]; then
    imageversion=$(pull_aws_latest "${imagename}")
    echo using latest image "${imagename}:${imageversion}" in sync with AWS
else
    imageversion=$(find_latest_tag ${imagename})
    echo using latest local image "${imagename}:${imageversion}"
fi

projname="${imagename%%-*}"
# Delete longest match of "-*" from back of string.

variantname="${imagename#*-}"
# Delete shortest match of "*-" from front of string.
# Value is 'dev' or 'prod'.

if [[ "${command}" == "pipeline" ]]; then
    if [[ $# < 1 ]]; then
        echo "${USAGE}"
        exit 1
    fi
    scriptname="$1"
fi

if [[ $(uname) == Linux && $(id -u) != 1000 ]]; then
    # Linux box.
    uid=$(id -u)
    dockeruser=${uid}
    opts="${opts} -e USER=${dockeruser} -u ${dockeruser}:docker -v /etc/group:/etc/group:ro -v /etc/passwd:/etc/passwd:ro"
else
    dockeruser='docker-user'
    opts="${opts} -e USER=${dockeruser} -u ${dockeruser}"
fi
dockerhomedir='/home/docker-user'
dockerworkdir="${dockerhomedir}/work"
hostworkdir="${HOME}/work"
workdir="${dockerworkdir}"

if [[ "${variantname}" == "dev" ]]; then
    SRCDIR="src/${projname}"
    opts="${opts} -v ${hostworkdir}/${SRCDIR}:${dockerworkdir}/${SRCDIR}"
    opts="${opts} -e SRCDIR=${dockerworkdir}/${SRCDIR}"
    opts="${opts} -e PYTHONPATH=${dockerworkdir}/src/${projname}"
    opts="${opts} -e SCRIPTDIR=${dockerworkdir}/src/${projname}/scripts"
    workdir="${dockerworkdir}/${SRCDIR}"
else
    opts="${opts} -e SCRIPTDIR=/usr/local/bin/my-org/${projname}"
fi

if [[ "${command}" == "notebook" ]]; then
    opts="${opts} --expose=8888 -p 8888:8888"
    workdir="${dockerworkdir}/tmp"
    command="jupyter notebook --port=8888 --no-browser --ip=0.0.0.0 --NotebookApp.notebook_dir='${workdir}' --NotebookApp.token=''"
elif [[ "${command}" == "py.test" ]]; then
    args="-p no:cacheprovider ${args}"
elif [[ "${command}" == "pipeline" ]]; then
    :  # do nothing, but stay away from '-it'
else
    opts="${opts} -it"
fi

opts="${opts}
-e HOME=${dockerhomedir}
--workdir ${workdir}
-e IMAGE_NAME=${imagename}
-e IMAGE_VERSION=${imageversion}
-e TZ=America/Los_Angeles
--rm --init"

LOGDIR=log/"${imagename}"
if [[ "${command}" == "pipeline" ]]; then
    LOGDIR="${LOGDIR}/${scriptname}"
fi
mkdir -p "${hostworkdir}/${LOGDIR}"
opts="${opts} -v ${hostworkdir}/${LOGDIR}:${dockerworkdir}/${LOGDIR}"
opts="${opts} -e LOGDIR=${dockerworkdir}/${LOGDIR}"

DATADIR="data/${imagename}"
mkdir -p "${hostworkdir}/${DATADIR}"
opts="${opts} -v ${hostworkdir}/${DATADIR}:${dockerworkdir}/${DATADIR}"
opts="${opts} -e DATADIR=${dockerworkdir}/${DATADIR}"

CFGDIR="config/${imagename}"
mkdir -p "${hostworkdir}/${CFGDIR}"
opts="${opts} -v ${hostworkdir}/${CFGDIR}:${dockerworkdir}/${CFGDIR}"
opts="${opts} -e CFGDIR=${dockerworkdir}/${CFGDIR}"

TMPDIR="tmp"
mkdir -p "${hostworkdir}/${TMPDIR}"
opts="${opts} -v ${hostworkdir}/${TMPDIR}:${dockerworkdir}/${TMPDIR}"
opts="${opts} -e TMPDIR=${dockerworkdir}/${TMPDIR}"

#set -x
docker run ${opts} ${imagename}:${imageversion} ${command} ${args}

There are quite a few things going on here, and I’m not going to wark through it. (It is somewhat simplified from the actual version I use, but all the patterns are here.) It will be helpful to know that I assume the project directory structure on the development machine follows the recommendations here.

This script gives special attention to two commands, namely pipeline and pyscript. They are installed in the image py3dev as shown in py3dev/build.sh. I’ll talk about them next.

The special commands pipeline and pyscript

Suppose there is a script app1/scripts/do-something.py. pipeline is a command installed into /usr/local/bin in image py3dev. Its intended use is like this:

run-docker app1-prod pipeline do-something.py [...args...]

Typically this is launched as a cron job. Note that pipeline is a command residing inside the container, on the standard command path, hence this is Docker’s standard way of launching a command inside the container without first landing on an interactive console in the container. How does pipeline find do-something.py? Well, it assumes the script is in the directory pointed to by $SCRIPTDIR, which is set up by run-docker. The build spec app1-prod/Dockerfile make sure to copy (or “install”) that script into the correct location. In run-docker, notice that $SCRIPTDIR points to different locations depending on whether the image is *-dev or *-prod.

pipeline handles logging and adds some contextual info to the log (things like “xxx is starting with arguments … at 2018-09-28 01:02:03 PST …”).

In contrast, pyscript is intended for one-off use. It does not handle logging; any printout of the program appears in the console directly. pyscript also finds do-something.py via $SCRIPTDIR. It is used in the same way:

run-docker app1-prod pyscript do-something.py [...args...]

Below is the script pipeline:

#!/usr/bin/env bash

set -o errexit
set -o nounset
set -o pipefail

USAGE=$(cat <<'EOF'
This script resides within a Docker image, and calls a Python program
in `${SCRIPTDIR}`.

Usage:
    pipeline task [args]

`task` indicates the Python script that is to be run.
For example, if `task` is `abc.py`, then `${SCRIPTDIR}/abc.py` will be run.

`args` are optional arguments to be passed on to the Python script.
EOF
)

if [[ $# < 1 ]]; then
    echo "${USAGE}"
    exit 1
fi

if [[ $# < 1 ]]; then
    echo "${USAGE}"
    exit 1
fi

task="$1"
shift

: "${SCRIPTDIR:?Environment variable \'SCRIPTDIR\' is not set}"
: "${LOGDIR:?Environment variable \'LOGDIR\' is not set}"
: "${DATADIR:?Environment variable \'DATADIR\' is not set}"

: "${IMAGE_NAME:?}"
: "${IMAGE_VERSION:?}"


PYSCRIPT="${SCRIPTDIR}"/${task}

echo | multilog s1000000 n30 "${LOGDIR}"
echo | multilog s1000000 n30 "${LOGDIR}"
echo "========================================" | multilog s1000000 n30 "${LOGDIR}"
date --utc +'%Y-%m-%d %H:%M:%S UTC' | multilog s1000000 n30 "${LOGDIR}"
echo in Docker image "${IMAGE_NAME}:${IMAGE_VERSION}" | multilog s1000000 n30 "${LOGDIR}"
echo "$(env)" | multilog s1000000 n30 "${LOGDIR}"
echo | multilog s1000000 n30 "${LOGDIR}"
echo starting task \`${task}\` | multilog s1000000 n30 "${LOGDIR}"
if [[ "${task}" != *.py ]]; then
    echo Unrecognized script "'${task}'" --- did you forget the extension? | multilog s1000000 n30 "${LOGDIR}"
    echo Aborting... | multilog s1000000 n30 "${LOGDIR}"
    exit 1
fi
echo python -u ${PYSCRIPT} $@ | multilog s1000000 n30 "${LOGDIR}"
echo "----------------------------------------" | multilog s1000000 n30 "${LOGDIR}"
echo | multilog s1000000 n30 "${LOGDIR}"

python -u ${PYSCRIPT} $@ 2>&1 | multilog s1000000 n30 "${LOGDIR}"

echo | multilog s1000000 n30 "${LOGDIR}"
echo "----------------------------------------" | multilog s1000000 n30 "${LOGDIR}"
date --utc +'%Y-%m-%d %H:%M:%S UTC' | multilog s1000000 n30 "${LOGDIR}"
echo task \`${task}\` finished | multilog s1000000 n30 "${LOGDIR}"
echo "========================================" | multilog s1000000 n30 "${LOGDIR}"

The log rotation tool multilog (see Simple Rotating Log Capture) is installed in py3dev/Dockerfile.

The script pyscript is slightly simpler since it does not worry about logging:

#!/usr/bin/env bash

set -o errexit
set -o nounset
set -o pipefail

USAGE=$(cat <<'EOF'
This script resides within a Docker image, and calls a Python program
in `${SCRIPTDIR}`.

Usage:
    py-script task [args]

`task` indicates the Python script that is to be run.
For example, if `task` is `abc.py`, then `${SCRIPTDIR}/abc.py` will be run.

`args` are optional arguments to be passed on to the Python script.
EOF
)

if [[ $# < 1 ]]; then
    echo "${USAGE}"
    exit 1
fi


task="$1"
shift

: "${SCRIPTDIR:?Environment variable \'SCRIPTDIR\' is not set}"


PYSCRIPT="${SCRIPTDIR}"/${task}

if [[ "${task}" != *.py ]]; then
    echo Unrecognized script "'${task}'" --- did you forget the extension?
    echo Aborting...
    exit 1
fi

python -u ${PYSCRIPT} $@

Below is the segment of py3dev/Dockerfile that installs pipeline and pyscript:

COPY pipeline /usr/local/bin/
RUN chmod +x /usr/local/bin/pipeline
COPY pyscript /usr/local/bin/
RUN chmod +x /usr/local/bin/pyscript

In app1-prod/Dockerfile, the scripts under app1/scripts/ are copied into /usr/local/bin/my-org/app1, as is hinted at in run-docker.

Auto-build the images

Now how to build and use the images is behind us, we can finally turn to auto build the images. The main points of the idea are

  1. Building images need to use the latest code of the repo my-docker. A simple way to do this in a cron job is by downloading the latest code everytime the cron job runs.
  2. Provide a script in my-docker that does version checking, image building, and all that.
  3. Provide a more stable, simple script that handles downloading the code of my-docker. This script is what is called by cron.

The downloader is simple as the following:

#!/usr/bin/env bash

thisfile="${BASH_SOURCE[0]}"
thisdir="$( cd $( dirname ${thisfile} ) && pwd )"

export GITHUB_ACCESS_TOKEN="fill this out in deployed copy"
: "${GITHUB_ACCESS_TOKEN:?}"

# Also make sure other environment variables required by `common.sh` are defined,
# possibly by 'sourcing' in a file containing definition of the variables.

echo
echo ======================================================
echo $(date)
echo fetching the latest of \'my-docker:master\'...
echo

URL=https://github.com/my-org/my-docker/archive/master.zip
GIT_TOKEN="Authorization: token ${GITHUB_ACCESS_TOKEN}"
cd /tmp
rm -f my-docker.zip
curl -skL --retry 3 -H "${GIT_TOKEN}" ${URL} -o my-docker.zip
rm -rf my-docker-master
unzip my-docker.zip

echo
echo ----------------------------------------
echo finished fetching \'my-docker:master\'
echo starting to build images...
echo

cd my-docker-master
bash auto-build.sh

echo
echo finished building images.
echo $(date)
echo -----------------------------------------

The heavy-lifter auto-build.sh is listed below.

set -Eeuo pipefail

thisfile="${BASH_SOURCE[0]}"
thisdir="$( cd $( dirname ${thisfile} ) && pwd )"
source "${thisdir}/common.sh"

: "${GITHUB_ACCESS_TOKEN:?}"

GIT_TOKEN="Authorization: token ${GITHUB_ACCESS_TOKEN}"


function find_latest_branch_commit {
    repo="$1"
    branch="$2"
    url="https://api.github.com/repos/my-org/${repo}/git/refs/heads/${branch}"
    z=$(curl -s -H "${GIT_TOKEN}" ${url})
    sha=$(grep '"sha": ' <<< "$z")
    sha=${sha##*\"sha\": \"}
    sha=${sha%\",}
    echo "${sha}"
}


function get_commit {
    repo="$1"
    sha="$2"
    url="https://api.github.com/repos/my-org/${repo}/git/commits/${sha}"
    z=$(curl -s -H "${GIT_TOKEN}" ${url})
    echo "${z}"
}


function get_latest_branch_commit {
    repo="$1"
    branch="$2"
    get_commit "${repo}" "$(find_latest_branch_commit $repo $branch)"
}


function get_latest_branch_commit_date {
    z="$(get_latest_branch_commit $@)"
    z=$(grep "\"date\": \"" <<< "$z" | head -1)
    z="${z#*\"date\": \"}"
    z="${z%\"}"    # string formatted like '2018-09-04T23:12:50Z'
    z="${z//-/}"
    z="${z//:/}"   # string formatted like '20180904T231250Z'
    echo "$z"
}


function get_latest_aws_tag_date {
    z=$(find_aws_latest_tag "$1")    # tag is formmated like '20180904T231250Z'
    echo "$z"
}


function main {
    if [[ "$(get_latest_branch_commit_date my-docker master)" > "$(get_latest_aws_tag_date py3dev)" ]]; then
        echo
        echo "'my-docker:master' has updated; re-building everything..."
        echo
        bash "${thisdir}/build.sh"
    else
        if [[ "$(get_latest_branch_commit_date infra develop)" > "$(get_latest_aws_tag_date infra-prod)" ]]; then
            echo
            echo "'infra:develop' has updated; re-building most images..."
            echo

            (cd "${thisdir}"/infra-prod && bash build.sh push)

            repos=( app1 )
            for repo in "${repos[@]}"; do
                (cd "${thisdir}"/${repo}-dev && bash build.sh push)
                (cd "${thisdir}"/${repo}-prod && bash build.sh push)
            done
        else
            repos=( app1 )
            for repo in "${repos[@]}"; do
                if [[ "$(get_latest_branch_commit_date ${repo} develop)" > "$(get_latest_aws_tag_date ${repo}-prod)" ]]; then
                    echo
                    echo "'${repo}:develop' has updated; re-building '${repo}-prod'"
                    echo
                    (cd "${thisdir}/${repo}" && bash build.sh push)
                fi
            done
        fi
    fi
    return 0
}

main

Written on September 30, 2018